Over the last twenty years, we’ve rescued thousands of animals. Hundreds currently call the Sanctuary “home.” We’d like to introduce you to a few rescues here— and we hope you visit and meet them in person or on Animals on Call!

Abram & Izzy

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Abram & Izzy were saved from religious sacrifice by a man who quickly found himself overwhelmed caring for them — he told us he "hoped they wouldn't be eaten," but he was "running out of options."
Abram was named in honor of Stacey Abrams, whose courage, leadership and strength have inspired all of us. Abram gazes up at new humans with rapt attention, eager to meet, greet, and playfully head-butt. Izzy, shyer and smaller, is his best friend and faithful buddy. They're always together.

Al

Al was found wandering the streets in Brooklyn and was brought to Catskill Animal Sanctuary by a concerned citizen. Al is a Cornish Cross rooster, which is the breed of rooster most commonly raised for their flesh. Because Al grew so big so fast, he has a condition called Bumblefoot, which means his feet are extremely sensitive, sore, and subject to infection—but Al never lets that slow him down! He’s got a lot of attitude and loves a good chest scratch.

Alice

Alice and Leo came to the Sanctuary after being rescued from a goat farm where they would have been killed for their flesh. Alice had been rejected by her mother and Leo was born blind, so the farmer planned to kill them both rather than give them the care they needed. A kindhearted rescuer stepped in to rescue Alice and was given Leo as well. She brought them to the Sanctuary, where they lived for several months in happiness together. Leo passed away in early 2019. We miss him every day. Alice became part of our “Underfoot Herd,” bonding with Hermione and Tigger, two of our most affectionate goats.

Amelia

Our sassy girl Amelia was rescued as a piglet from a notorious animal hoarder, who had a pile of carcasses in the woods. Like most pigs, she is sensitive and fiercely intelligent; unlike most pigs, she can be moody and quick to snap. Watch your fingers!

Arlo

When local "humane" farm, Sprout Creek, closed down due to a decrease in funding and COVID-19, their animals were listed to be sent to auction. Hundreds of people messaged us asking, "Can you help?" After local animal organizations, Hudson Valley Animal Rescue and Sanctuary (HVARS) and Hunks n Hunnies Sanctuary, rehomed about 200 of the animals, we brought Arlo and his friends, Chester, Mollie, and Levi, home to Catskill Animal Sanctuary. Read their full story here.

Atticus

Atticus and dozens of other sheep were rescued from an illegal slaughter operation, where numerous animals were found starving, desperately sick, or dead. The bony bodies of the living were covered in matted, feces-filled wool, and most suffered from severe footrot. The weakened babies could barely nurse, and many debilitated mothers lacked adequate milk. Today, Atticus is a sweet and headstrong member of the “Underfoot Family” who is not afraid to use our staff members’ legs as face scratching posts!

Audrey

When pig farmer Bob Comis had a change of heart, he managed to find homes for eight members of his last herd. Audrey was spared because, in Bob’s words, she was “the smartest pig.”

Bartleby

When Bartleby’s human had to downsize in 2015, he came to live with us at Catskill Animal Sanctuary, where his big personality and love of cheek scratches has made him a favorite in our “Underfoot Herd.”

Benjamin

Benjamin arrived as a six-month-old calf after a New Jersey beef farmer had a change of heart and decided to place his remaining cows in sanctuaries. Luckily for Benjamin, not only did we have room, little Blossom needed a sibling.

Blossom

It’s quite rare for cows to reject their offspring, but that’s exactly what Blossom’s mom did at a grass-fed beef farm. The Brattleboro farmer gave her to a farm worker, who reached out to us. Tucker the steer was as happy as we were to welcome little Blossom.

Buddy

Buddy arrived in 2007, newly blind and suffering from dangerous, debilitating panic attacks. Today, loud or unfamiliar sounds still create anxiety, but he’s generally a happy, expressive goofball. At 32, he has some health challenges but, for now, with outstanding care, his quality of life remains good.

Buddy

Buddy was loved for all of his life, but when he was diagnosed with Uveitis and went blind, his family, who was going through personal turmoil, could no longer care for him. On the day he was scheduled to be euthanized, we brought him home. After spending a few weeks at a neighboring stable, Buddy is home at Catskill Animal Sanctuary. He is the fourth blind horse named Buddy we've been fortunate enough to give a second chance. Bringing him home in the year of our 20th anniversary was very moving for us.

Cecilia

Cecilia Chickadee and Kate Brownie were being cared for and loved in someone's apartment. When the landlord discovered that there were two turkeys in the attic, he called animal control and demanded they be rehomed. Heartbroken, their caretaker turned to us. We were unable to take them right away, so Farm Sanctuary in Watkins Glen was kind enough to foster them for us until we were prepared to welcome them home. They arrived in June 2021.

Charlotte

Now 14 years old, Charlotte and her recently deceased friend Maggie spent a year locked in a cage at a dog and cat shelter, because that's all the shelter had. Charlotte and Maggie were slated for euthanasia when we intervened. Charlotte is reserved, but if you approach slowly and sit down with her, she’ll hang with you.

Chester

When local "humane" farm, Sprout Creek, closed down due to a decrease in funding and COVID-19, their animals were listed to be sent to auction. Hundreds of people messaged us asking, "Can you help?" After local animal organizations, Hudson Valley Animal Rescue and Sanctuary (HVARS) and Hunks n Hunnies Sanctuary, rehomed about 200 of the animals, we brought Chester and his friends, Arlo, Mollie, and Levi, home to Catskill Animal Sanctuary. Read their full story here.

Collette

Collette was rescued in 2015 at the age of 10, along with 13 other horses from a Saratoga, NY, hoarder who, despite having dozens of horses, had no food for them when we arrived. Hoarding is now recognized as a mental illness. Collette is very closely bonded with her friend, Rowdy, who was rescued with her. Collette did not like humans when she first arrived, but with Rowdy’s help, she’s come around and has grown to trust people again.

Cricket

Cricket was rescued from the notorious hoarder depicted in our founder Kathy’s book, Where the Blind Horse Sings. Cricket was chained by the leg to a tree, without access to water or shelter, and endured this wretched life for nearly two years while many worked tirelessly to bring her to safety. This breathtaking photo was taken the first moment Cricket was released into her large pasture.

Daisy

Daisy was rescued from a petting zoo, where she sadly would have been auctioned off when she got too big to be around small children. Thankfully, she was rescued by a kind soul, who was able to place her with us. She's very kind and gentle, and very, very soft.

Darwin

At just under a year old, sweet Darwin is the youngest cow at the Sanctuary.
Darwin was born on a dairy farm and taken in by a family as a companion for their daughter. She lived in a field with horses, but cried out for the companionship of her own kind. The family explored their options: Darwin could go back to the dairy farm, to a nearby beef farm, or to Catskill Animal Sanctuary. The final decision was left up to this young girl, only fifteen, who had named Darwin and who loved her deeply. She learned what the outcome would be for Darwin on the beef farm and at the dairy. And when she visited us, she saw what Darwin’s life could look like, not just for a little while, but for all of her days.
She chose Sanctuary. And we couldn’t say no to offering Darwin a safe haven for life. As we mark our 20th year of rescue, she will become part of the next generation of beloved, heart-opening beings who call the Sanctuary “home.”

Davey

Davey’s mother, Laverne was rescued from a massive tenant farm & hoarding/neglect situation in Westport, MA with efforts from the ASPCA. Including cats and dogs, 997 animals were seized. Laverne showcased classic signs of neglect, including being very underweight. We later discovered that she and three others from the Westport, MA rescue were pregnant. Laverne gave birth to Davey—who was one of the biggest babies we’ve EVER seen—at Catskill Animal Sanctuary. Now, Davey has taken on a protector role for all the sheep in his flock.

Declan

Declan was rescued from an animal hoarder in the spring of 2012. Animal hoarding is a mental illness where a person acquires a large number of animals who they cannot properly care for. Due to the nature of the mental illness, the people afflicted often believe they are doing the right thing, however, most often, the animals are sick and often dying. Today, Declan is as happy as can be as he resides proudly over his many turkey hens at Sanctuary.

Dozer

Dozer, a massive Jersey cross steer and one of our gentle giants, went from a New Jersey veal farm to a traveling petting zoo. His rescuer kept him in her backyard but soon realized he was getting far too big and needed more than she could provide. How delighted we were to welcome him!

Ferguson

Ferguson was born at Catskill Animal Sanctuary to Cleo, who was rescued from a massive tenant farm & hoarding/neglect situation in Westport, MA. Mama Cleo showcased classic signs of neglect, including being very underweight. We later discovered that she was pregnant! Cleo was the first to give birth, but there were complications and Cleo was rushed to the vet. Sadly, one of her babies didn’t make it, but little Ferguson was miraculously revived by Dr. Ferguson, who he was named after.

Freddie and Travis

Best friends Freddy and Travis are loving, people-friendly chicks who were part of a group brought to us by a concerned child and her mom after an elementary school’s egg-hatching project. Chicks born to this archaic practice rarely meet a happy ending.

Giselle and Sabine

Giselle and Sabine were lucky to survive when their crate fell from a transport truck leaving Hudson Valley Foie Gras. The other ducks packed into the crate were not so lucky. When the girls arrived, they were caked with dried food and utterly terrified of humans. Today, they enjoy their friendship and a tranquil life on our pond.

Hermione

Dear Hermione was dumped on the lawn of The Homestead, emaciated and riddled with internal and external parasites, rotting hooves and scours. We were concerned that she wouldn’t survive, but she did, and today she’s Tigger’s special buddy and a happy-go-lucky member of our free-ranging “Underfoot Family.”

Imogen

We’re not too sure where Imogen came from, so we like to joke that the “Turkey Fairy” brought her to us! Based on her size, breed, and the conditions she arrived in, we know she was probably being raised to wind up on someone’s plate for Thanksgiving. Now, Imogen is one of the biggest cuddle bugs on the whole property. She loves to be petted and has even been known to purr like a cat.

Jacqueline

In 2015, we rescued 27 goats from the notorious “backyard butcher” in Newburgh, NY. More than 100 animals were rescued that day; all had lice, a parasite count so high that many were severely anemic, fungal infections, respiratory issues, and a contagious virus known as ORF. Jacqueline was rescued pregnant and gave birth to daughters Lonnie and Loretta while at Catskill Animal Sanctuary.

Joyce

In 2015, we rescued 27 goats from the notorious “backyard butcher” in Newburgh, NY. More than 100 animals were rescued that day; all had lice, a parasite count so high that many were severely anemic, fungal infections, respiratory issues, and a contagious virus known as ORF. Joyce was rescued pregnant and gave birth to her daughter, Iris, while at Catskill Animal Sanctuary.

Jasmine

Just call her St. Jasmine! Rescued after living as a feral pig, Jasmine spent two years as the ever-patient step mom to eleven piglets. She’s deeply kind and affectionate and has a special friendship with Travis the rooster.

Keira

When a bankrupt industrial chicken farm closed its doors in the winter of 2018, leaving their baby chickens to freeze or starve, Keira was one of the thousands left behind. Dedicated rescuers managed to save 610 chickens, and Winter, along with 14 of her siblings, came to live at the Sanctuary, where they’ve been able to thrive, knowing love for the first time. Keira loves to sit on laps and get a nice snuggle under her wings.

Levi

When local "humane" farm, Sprout Creek, closed down due to a decrease in funding and COVID-19, their animals were listed to be sent to auction. Hundreds of people messaged us asking, "Can you help?" After local animal organizations, Hudson Valley Animal Rescue and Sanctuary (HVARS) and Hunks n Hunnies Sanctuary, rehomed about 200 of the animals, we brought Levi and his friends, Chester, Mollie, and Arlo, home to Catskill Animal Sanctuary. Read their full story here.

Little John

A prominent vet in the animal welfare field rescued Little John and his friend, Robin Hood, from a school hatching project. Unfortunately, many of the birds (especially roosters) who are hatched in classrooms meet a very sad ending. We're very happy that Little John and Robin Hood were saved!

Lonnie

Lonnie’s mother, Jacqueline, was rescued in 2015 from the notorious “backyard butcher” in Newburgh, NY. More than 100 animals were rescued that day; all had lice, a parasite count so high that many were severely anemic, fungal infections, respiratory issues, and a contagious virus known as ORF. Shortly after Jacqueline’s arrival, we discovered she was pregnant. In January 2016, Jacqueline gave birth to sisters Lonnie and Loretta. Because Lonnie was born here, she’s only ever known kindness.

Loretta

Loretta’s mother, Jacqueline, was rescued in 2015 from the notorious “backyard butcher” in Newburgh, NY. More than 100 animals were rescued that day; all had lice, a parasite count so high that many were severely anemic, fungal infections, respiratory issues, and a contagious virus known as ORF. Shortly after Jacqueline’s arrival, we discovered she was pregnant. In January 2016, Jacqueline gave birth to sisters Lonnie and Loretta. Because Loretta was born here, she’s only ever known kindness.

Malika

We’re not too sure where Malika came from, so we like to joke that the “Turkey Fairy” brought her to us! Based on her size, breed, and the conditions she arrived in, we know she was probably being raised to wind up on someone’s plate for Thanksgiving. Now, Malika enjoys bossing her other turkey friends around and taking dust baths.

Madeline

Sweet Madeline is one of 11 piglets surrendered to PETA by a Virginia woman who couldn’t care for them. Madeline and her siblings have been part of the Sanctuary family since June 2015.

Mario

When pig farmer Bob Comis had a change of heart, he managed to find homes for eight members of his last herd. Mario was spared because, in Bob’s words, he was “the kindest pig.”

Micah

Micah and dozens of other sheep were rescued from an illegal slaughter operation, where numerous animals were found starving, desperately sick, or dead. The bony bodies of the living were covered in matted, feces-filled wool, and most suffered from severe foot rot. The weakened babies could barely nurse, and many debilitated mothers lacked adequate milk. Today, Micah is a loving and outgoing member of the “Underfoot Family.”

Mollie

When local "humane" farm, Sprout Creek, closed down due to a decrease in funding and COVID-19, their animals were listed to be sent to auction. Hundreds of people messaged us asking, "Can you help?" After local animal organizations, Hudson Valley Animal Rescue and Sanctuary (HVARS) and Hunks n Hunnies Sanctuary, rehomed about 200 of the animals, we brought Mollie and her friends, Chester, Arlo, and Levi, home to Catskill Animal Sanctuary. Read their full story here.

Nellie

Nellie was on a slaughter truck when she luckily gave birth… and was dropped off with her baby at a dog rescue, instead of at the slaughterhouse.

Nina

Nina was rescued from a live market in Astoria, where she (and so many others) would have been chosen, killed, and eaten for Easter. However, a kindhearted couple tearily pleaded with the shop owner to let them rescue Nina, and the shop owner agreed, though he didn’t quite understand why the couple didn’t want him to bind Nina’s feet for easier transport. When Nina arrived, she was riddled with diseases that are all too common for animals raised in poor conditions for their flesh. After she was given a clean bill of health, Nina became a part of our “Underfoot Herd,” where she quickly chose Shirley to be her “adoptive mama.” The two are often seen together grazing and exploring the Sanctuary.

Petunia June

Sponsor an AnimalPetunia June was found wandering the streets of New York. Because she had the tip of her beak cut, our guess is that she liberated herself from a live market. Currently, there are more than 80 live markets within city limits. She was brought to Sanctuary by our friends at Wild Bird Fund. In the time she's been at Sanctuary, Petunia June has made us all fall in love with her! Between her outgoing personality and her absolutely adorable face, she takes our breath away!

Pia + Zawadi

Pia and Zawadi (and their friend Xing) were set to be slaughtered at a live market in New York when Oscar, a college student with a big heart, stepped in and spared them from their fate. The three were Red Star hens and were most likely exploited for brown eggs before their laying declined and they were sent to be killed for their flesh. Sadly, Xing passed away at the Sanctuary. She is deeply missed. 

Pilar

Like Freddy and Travis, Pilar and Sidra are egg-hatching project survivors. A boy who didn’t want the chickens he’d hatched for his science class to die reached out for support, and Pilar and Sidra came to us. Pilar is a perfectly polite chicken; her pal Sidra is a brazen, in-your-face, my-way-or-the-highway kind of gal.

Rose Willow

This sweet girl found Sanctuary in our quarantine field after she was diagnosed with CAE, a contagious virus that commonly affects goats and sheep. Though a CAE diagnosis can mean death for someone like Rose Willow on a farm, her family wanted her to live out her life safely. Since we have a lot of experience managing CAE, we agreed to offer her a place with our other CAE+ and CL+ goats.

Rowdy

Rowdy was rescued in 2015, along with 13 other horses from a Saratoga, NY, hoarder who, despite having dozens of horses, had no food for them when we arrived. Hoarding is now recognized as a mental illness. Rowdy is very closely bonded with his friend, Collette, who was rescued with him.

Rudy

Rudy arrived as a calf in 2006 when Catskill Game Farm closed its doors and many animals met tragic fates. He came with Amos, Jesse, and Patty. Rudy is a very affectionate steer who lives with big man, Dozer.

Russell

We welcomed young Russell from a dog and cat shelter in 2010, when he was merely a year old. He was adopted a year later but returned in 2017, when his aging human could no longer provide proper care. A member of the “Underfoot Family,” Russell clocks several miles a day roaming the Sanctuary in search of tasty treats. No FitBit needed!

Ruth

Ruth arrived with raw, featherless flesh on her back, neck, and wings. While living in a backyard flock and exploited for her eggs, Ruthie was being picked on by one of the other chickens. Her human wanted a better life for her and brought her to live at Sanctuary. Ruthie is one of the most outspoken chickens on the property, which is how she earned her name in honor of Ruth Bader Ginsberg.

Scout

Scout and dozens of other sheep were rescued from an illegal slaughter operation, where numerous animals were found starving, desperately sick, or dead. The bony bodies of the living were covered in matted, feces-filled wool, and most suffered from severe foot rot. The weakened babies could barely nurse, and many debilitated mothers lacked adequate milk. Today, Scout is a proud, confident and kind leader of the “Underfoot Family.”

Sebastian

When a Long Island woman learned that a local gang was shooting and burning feral cats, she began desperately trying to save them and, in so doing, discovered Sebastian the rooster and some hens. With patience, she finally trapped them all and brought them to us. (Rumor has it, they’re far happier here.) What Sebastian lacks in size he makes up for in attitude.

Sidra

Like Freddy and Travis, Pilar and Sidra are egg-hatching project survivors. A boy who didn’t want the chickens he’d hatched for his science class to die reached out for support, and Pilar and Sidra came to us. Pilar is a perfectly polite chicken; her pal Sidra is a brazen, in-your-face, my-way-or-the-highway kind of gal. Sidra and Pilar—along with their rooster, Sebastian—are a part of our "Underfoot Herd," and are often spotted seeking snacks around the grounds.

Talia

Talia came back to Catskill Animal Sanctuary in the spring of 2020 after being adopted in 2016. Sadly, all Talia's companions had passed away and her human was dealing with illness, so she came back home to us. We were initially worried that her old friends, Atticus, Zeke, Scout, and Micah, might not recognize Talia or welcome her back, but she was accepted back into her herd as if she had never left.

Thelma

Thelma and her sheep friend, Shirley, were brought to Catskill Animal Sanctuary in 2013. When their human could no longer care for them, they were going to be sent to their neighbor for slaughter. Luckily, they wound up at Catskill Animal Sanctuary instead, where they can live out the rest of their lives in peace. Thelma is one of our shyer residents, but she is a proud member of our “Underfoot Herd.”

Tucker

Tucker came to live at Catskill Animal Sanctuary in February of 2009 after first living at a petting zoo for a full season. During his time there, a mother and daughter fell in love with Tucker, enjoying every visit with him. However, once the visiting season ended, they were horrified to discover that he would be sent to slaughter, like most baby animals who live temporarily at petting zoos. Tucker found a permanent home with us, and his gentle demeanor has earned him the moniker, “3,000-pound puppy dog.”

Shirley

Shirley and her goat friend, Thelma, were brought to Catskill Animal Sanctuary in 2013. When their human could no longer care for them, they were going to be sent to their neighbor for slaughter. Luckily, they wound up at Catskill Animal Sanctuary instead, where they can live out the rest of their lives in peace. Though Shirley has spent the last number of years wary of human attention, since she “adopted” baby Nina in 2019, Shirley is slowly beginning to trust humans again.

Sister Mary Frances

Born in 2010, Sister Mary Francis was surrendered by a woman who was evicted from her home. Now Sister Mary Frances is a delightful member of the “Underfoot Family,” whose tail rarely stops wagging.

Valentina

Valentina was first rescued by a wildlife rehabber with her friend, Dixie, who has since passed away. When Dixie and Valentina arrived, they had frostbite so bad that their feet were misshapen. Valentina now lives with infamous Bruce the Duck. Valentina is one of our shier residents, but her friend Bruce is a lot more outgoing.

Vanna

Vanna was rescued pregnant from an illegal backyard slaughter facility that was dubbed the “backyard butcher” case. Vanna gave birth to triplets Annie, Tula, and Violet on January 25th, 2016. 

Violet

Violet’s mother, Vanna, was rescued pregnant from an illegal backyard slaughter facility that was dubbed the “backyard butcher” case. Violet and her two sisters, Annie and Tula, were born on January 25th, 2016. Violet was underdeveloped when she was born, and because Vanna lived in such awful conditions for so long, Vanna rejected Violet at birth. Kellie Myers, former Health Care Coordinator and long-time caregiver, bottle-fed Violet until she was big enough to join our “Underfoot Herd,” where she currently thrives, chasing the feed truck around and being sassy.

Winter

When a bankrupt industrial chicken farm closed its doors in the winter of 2018, leaving their baby chickens to freeze or starve, Winter was one of the thousands left behind. Dedicated rescuers managed to save 610 chickens, and Winter, along with 14 of her siblings, came to live at the Sanctuary, where they’ve been able to thrive, knowing love for the first time. Winter has a totally independent spirit. She loves escaping her yard and taking walks around the Sanctuary to check out tractors, look for snacks, and inspect the pig fields.

Zeke

Zeke and dozens of other sheep were rescued from an illegal slaughter operation, where numerous animals were found starving, desperately sick, or dead. The bony bodies of the living were covered in matted, feces-filled wool, and most suffered from severe footrot. The weakened babies could barely nurse, and many debilitated mothers lacked adequate milk. Today, Zeke is a bold—and sometimes demanding—member of our “Underfoot Family.”