When kids have the opportunity to meet the animals up close, we witness the transformational power of that connection.

Through virtual programs at Catskill Animal Sanctuary, your students can help build a relationship with the animals who share our planet – no matter where in the world you’re located!
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Our virtual programs:

  • Prioritize student engagement
  • Encourage students to engage with questions
  • Introduce the animals as individuals and as ambassadors for their species
  • Present discussion opportunities such as: effects of animal agriculture on humans + the environment

Download Our FREE Educational Program Guide

All programs include virtual interaction with the rescued animals – sharing their rescue stories and highlighting their individual personalities. Beyond the basics, program topics can be tailored to your class, and may include the discussion about the lives of animals on farms, the effects of animal agriculture, or making animal-friendly choices.

Your group can request to focus your program on a specific species – pigs, chickens, turkeys, cows, ducks, goats, sheep, and rabbits. While we try to accommodate requests to meet specific sanctuary residents, the animals have their own schedules and might be sleeping, getting a health check, or not in the mood to be on camera!

And of course, the programs are fun and engaging! Animals On Call provides a one-of-a-kind break to the school day that will snap kids out of “Zoom fatigue.” The animals are always up to something – maybe we’ll catch a goat jumping around in the back of a truck, a flock of chickens following a staff member to ask for treats, or a sheep begging for attention by nudging people with their hoof!

Talking about animal cruelty can be difficult for people of any age. Our humane educators are experienced in sharing information in an age- and developmentally-appropriate way. Discussions around animal rescue are very different for elementary, middle, and high schoolers. But no matter the age – we always come back to the positive. People see animals in need and want to help, and there are so many ways we can all make a difference!

Check out our website https://casanctuary.org/animals-on-call/

Select your preferred date and time on the calendar at the bottom of the registration page, fill in your information, and one of our humane educators will be in touch shortly!

Programs are generally available every half hour from 8 am to 5 pm ET. Times may vary depending on the season and staff availability. and slots do fill up, so we encourage you to book as soon as possible if you have a specific day in mind.

Our humane educators can call into your classroom on any video conferencing platform – Zoom, Google Meet, Go To Meeting, RingCentral, Skype, and more. We recommend using the same app that you and your students are accustomed to using so they’ll be familiar with it! We can also host the virtual program on our video conferencing platform, RingCentral.

If one program isn’t enough, you can book an entire program series! For example, you can choose four Species-Specific programs in which your students will meet a different species in each one. Over the course of multiple classes, students will be able to compare and contrast the different species and gain a deeper understanding of the animals.

Programs run 30 minutes. We can accommodate shorter or longer times by request, though longer programs may incur additional costs.

The base program fee is $100 for 30 minutes. Depending on your school’s financial situation, grant support is available to waive some or all of the fee. If you’d like to explore this option, please contact us directly at tourstaff@casanctuary.org.

For a more in-depth sanctuary experience, book a program series! Discounts are available for multiple programs:

We recommend starting off with “Why Sanctuaries Rescue Animals”.

From there, you can choose multiple species-specific programs—cows one week, pigs the next week, and chickens the last one, building on knowledge from previous sessions to see how the animals compare to each other.

OR, if you want to focus on a particular type of animal, you could focus on cows one week, then a cow-focused Animal Agriculture Today program, and then dive into the environmental impacts of raising cows in “Our Choices and the Environment.”

There are so many possibilities! We’re happy to discuss options that will fit your group’s needs.

For students engaged in remote learning:

  • Make sure everyone has an internet connection and the video conferencing application loaded onto their computer, laptop, tablet, or phone.
  • Students are welcome to turn their cameras on or off, depending on their preference.
  • We ask that everyone keep their microphones off unless they are actively engaged in the discussion. This makes it easier for everyone to hear!
  • Students should make use of the “Raise Hand” option when they have something they want to share.
  • Students can use the chat to ask questions or share on-topic thoughts throughout the program if your classroom rules allow for it.

For students in the classroom:

  • You can use your SmartBoard or other projection systems to show the program to the whole room. You’ll just need the video conferencing applications on your computer and a microphone.
  • It’s great if you have a webcam in your classroom so we can see your students!
  • You can call on students to ask and answer questions. It’s helpful for our staff if the student comes up to the microphone so that we can hear them better!

Otherwise, you can prepare your students as you normally would for a guest speaker. Especially for younger children, it can be helpful to remind them of classroom communication rules. We can also provide you with suggested preparation questions depending on your program’s topic and the ages of your group.

We love being a surprise, and kids are thrilled when they see a goat or chicken suddenly appear on the screen! Just let us know if you want the visit to be a surprise for your group

Catskill Animal Sanctuary’s programs are aligned with Next Generation Science Standards, New York ELA standards and Common Core ELA standards, the EngageNY ELA Curriculum, and the New York Humane Education Law. If your school is outside of New York we probably can help support your standards too! Please reach out to us to discuss your class’s needs.

Several states have enacted Humane Education laws. The laws cover a variety of topics, such as allowing students to opt-out of dissections, how to treat animals in the classroom, and lessons to teach to students to help foster compassion and kindness towards all living beings.

The Humane Education Law in New York (S809) reads, in part:

The officer, board or commission authorized or required to prescribe courses of instruction shall cause instruction to be given in every elementary school under state control or supported wholly or partly by public money of the state, in the humane treatment and protection of animals and the importance of the part they play in the economy of nature as well as the necessity of controlling the proliferation of animals which are subsequently abandoned and caused to suffer extreme cruelty. Such instruction shall be for such period of time during each school year as the board of regents may prescribe and may be joined with work in literature, reading, language, nature study, or ethnology. Such weekly instruction may be divided into two or more periods. A school district shall not be entitled to participate in the public school money on account of any school or the attendance at any school subject to the provisions of this section if the instruction required hereby is not given therein.

The bolded section above indicates what our programs focus on.

Check this list to see if your state also has a Humane Education law:

California 51540 Sec 233-233.5

Florida 233.09

Illinois (105 ILCS 5/27-13.1-14-15-18)

Maine Chapter 111-20 1221

Massachusetts Chapter 272 Sec 80G

New Hampshire 644:8-c of the Criminal Code

New Jersey Title 18A 18A:35-4.1 4.3

Oregon 336.067

Pennsylvania 15-1514

Tennessee 15-38-11

Washington RCW 28A.230.020

Wisconsin Chapter 14.16

If you need to reschedule or cancel your program, please let us know as soon as possible so we can open up your slot for another group! If you cancel with less than 24 hours notice we may not be able to refund your program, but we can reschedule at no cost.

We know that technology can be finicky sometimes! The Sanctuary is in a rural location and we have occasional interruptions of internet service, and other unforeseen issues can arise. Generally, these interruptions only last a few seconds – and they rarely happen at all! If there are significant connection issues or other issues such as a platform-wide outage beyond our control, we’ll reschedule your program.

Our Programs

Explore the whats, whys, and hows of animal sanctuaries through the Catskill Animal Sanctuary mission and history.

Learn what it takes to keep 200+ animals happy and healthy every day of the year, and why we focus on rescuing pigs, cows, chickens, and other farmed animals.

Educational standards supported by this program:

  • NYS Humane Education Law (New York State Only)
    • Sanctuary programs provide education and instruction that cover a variety of topics pertaining to the humane treatment and protection of animals, the importance of the part they play in the economy of nature, and the necessity of controlling the proliferation of animals [who] are subsequently abandoned and caused to suffer extreme cruelty. These topics are presented in ways that are age and developmentally appropriate for the students.
  • Kindergarten
    • K-LS1-1 (NGSS) Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive, by learning about the needs of different types of farmed animals
    • KSL1 (Common Core) Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse peers and adults in small and large groups and during play, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections
    • KSL3 (Common Core) Develop and answer questions to clarify what the speaker says, by asking relevant questions to the material at hand.
    • Domain K-2 (NY ELA) The Five Senses – Explore the different ways that animals sense and experience the world. Which ones have the strongest sense of smell, or the best vision?
    • Domain K-5 (NY ELA) Farms – Introduce students to several farmed animals to learn how the sanctuary meets their needs for food, water, and space to live and grow. It will also provide a view on farmed animals in a non-farm context, where they are rescued and cared for as companions to live long, healthy lives.
  • First Grade
    • 1-LS1-2 (NGSS) Read texts and use media to determine patterns of behavior in parents and offspring that help offspring survive, by observing the behavior of animals who are related to each other.
    • 1-LS3-1 (NGSS) Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that young plants and animals are like, but not exactly like, their parents, by observing the appearance of animals who are related to each other
    • 1SL1 (Common Core) Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse peers and adults (e.g., in small and large groups and during play), by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections
    • 1SL3 (Common Core) Develop and answer questions to clarify what the speaker says and identify a speaker’s point of view, by asking relevant questions to the material at hand.
    • Domain 1-8 (NY ELA) Animals and Habitats – Students will learn about the different types of habitats that animals need, even when they live near each other, and learn about the adaptations that the animals have to survive and meet their needs.
  • Second Grade
      • 2-LS2-2 (NGSS) Develop a simple model that illustrates how plants and animals depend on each other for survival, by considering how the animals use plants as food and shelter, and how we help the animals by meeting their needs.
      • 2SL1 (Common Core) Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse peers and adults in small and large groups and during play, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections
      • 2SL3 (Common Core) Develop and answer questions about what a speaker says; agree or disagree with the speaker’s point of view, providing a reason(s), by asking relevant questions to the material at hand and expressing their opinions.
  • Third Grade
      • 3-LS2-1 (NGSS) Construct an argument that some animals form groups that help members survive, by examining the behavior of animals who live in groups.
      • 3-LS3-1 (NGSS) Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence that plants and animals have traits inherited from parents and that variation of these traits exists in a group of similar organisms, by observing members of the same species and/or breed who are and are not related to each other.
      • 3SL1 (Common Core) Participate and engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse peers and adults, expressing ideas clearly, and building on those of others, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections.
      • 3SL3 (Common Core) Ask and answer questions in order to evaluate a speaker’s point of view, offering appropriate elaboration and detail, by asking insightful questions to the material at hand and expanding upon other knowledge that they’ve gained.
  • Fourth Grade
      • 4LS1 (Common Core) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners, expressing ideas clearly, and building on those of others by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections.
      • 4SL3 (Common Core) Identify and evaluate the reasons and evidence a speaker provides to support particular points, by asking insightful questions to the material at hand and considering other learning and opinions.
      • Domain 2B (NY ELA) Animal Defense Mechanisms – Learn about some of the unique ways that animals keep themselves and other members of their group safe.
  • Fifth Grade
      • 5SL1 (Common Core) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners; express ideas clearly and persuasively, and build on those of others, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections
      • 5SL3 (Common Core) Identify and evaluate the reasons and evidence a speaker provides to support particular points, by asking insightful questions to the material at hand and formulating opinions based on this and other information.

Explore the whats, whys, and hows of animal sanctuaries through the Catskill Animal Sanctuary mission and history.

Learn how rescued animals adapt to sanctuary life, and why we focus on rescuing pigs, cows, chickens and other farmed animals.

All Grades:

    • MS-LS4-5 (NGSS) Gather and synthesize information about the technologies that have changed the way humans influence the inheritance of desired traits in organisms, by learning about how selective breeding of farmed animals has changed their appearance, size, rate of growth, and reproduction.
    • MS-ESS3-5 (NGSS) Ask questions to clarify evidence of the factors that have caused the rise in global temperatures over the past century, by exploring how animal agriculture contributes to greenhouse gas emissions and how the scale of animal agriculture has grown in the last century.
    • MS-ESS3-4 (NGSS) Construct an argument supported by evidence for how increases in human population and per-capita consumption of natural resources impact Earth’s system, by exploring how the growth of animal agriculture has impacted resource consumption and contributes to greenhouse gas emissions and can contribute to water and air pollution.
  • Sixth Grade
    • 6SL1 (Common Core)Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners; express ideas clearly and persuasively, and build on those of others, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections.
    • 6SL2 (Common Core) Interpret information presented in diverse formats (e.g., including visual, quantitative, and oral) and explain how it relates to a topic, text, or issue under study, by exploring why sanctuaries rescued farmed animals and engage in humane education to create a better world for humans and animals.
    • 6SL3 (Common Core) Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not, by exploring how sanctuaries interpret the individuality of farmed animals and what scientific evidence exists about farmed animal intelligence.
  • Seventh Grade
      • 7SL1 (Common Core) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners; express ideas clearly and persuasively, and build on those of others, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections.
      • 7SL2 (Common Core) Analyze the central ideas and supporting details presented in diverse formats (e.g., including visual, quantitative, and oral) and explain how the ideas clarify and/or contribute to a topic, text, or issue under study, by exploring why Sanctuaries rescued farmed animals and engage in humane education to create a better world for humans and animals.
      • 7SL3 (Common Core) Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating for sound reasoning, and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence, by exploring how sanctuaries interpret the individuality of farmed animals and what scientific evidence exists about farmed animal intelligence.
  • Eighth Grade
      • 8SL1 (Common Core) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners; express ideas clearly and persuasively, and build on those of others, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections.
      • 8SL2 (Common Core) Analyze the purpose of information presented in diverse formats (e.g., including visual, quantitative, and oral) and evaluate the motives (e.g., social, commercial, political) behind its presentation, by exploring why Sanctuaries rescued farmed animals and engage in humane education to create a better world for humans and animals.
      • 8SL3 (Common Core) Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating for sound reasoning, and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence; identify when irrelevant evidence is introduced, by exploring how sanctuaries interpret the individuality of farmed animals and what scientific evidence exists about farmed animal intelligence. Learning about farmed animals and agriculture through storytelling that combines anecdotes and scientific findings.
      • Module 4 (NY ELA) Sustainability of World’s Food Supply – Consider different perspectives of how to feed the United States.

Explore the whats, whys, and hows of animal sanctuaries through the stories of Catskill Animal Sanctuary’s rescued animals.

Learn how humans’ relationships with farmed animals impact the animals and the environment, and why we focus on rescuing species like pigs, goats, chickens, and others.

  • All Grades
    • HS-ESS3-2 (NGSS) Evaluate competing design solutions for developing, managing, and utilizing energy and mineral resources based on cost-benefit ratios, by exploring why farmers have moved towards industrial animal agriculture to improve resource efficiency and the impact of this revolution in farming on animals, humans, and the environment.
    • HS-ESS3-4 (NGSS) Evaluate or refine a technological solution that reduces impacts of human activities on natural systems, by learning about the impact of industrial animal agriculture on animals, humans, and the environment and exploring alternatives.
  • Ninth + Tenth Grade
    • 9-10SL1 (Common Core) Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on complex topics, texts, and issues; express ideas clearly and persuasively, and build on those of others, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections about animal agriculture and its impact on animals, humans, and the environment.
    • 9-10SL2 (Common Core) Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats (e.g., including visual, quantitative, and oral), evaluating the credibility, accuracy, and relevance of each source, by evaluating the importance of farmed animal sanctuaries through discussion about the lives of farmed on and off sanctuaries after a visual and oral presentation.
    • 9-10SL3 (Common Core) Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric; identify any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence, by interacting with the humane educator who is presenting a new viewpoint on the lives of farmed animals. Students are encouraged to ask questions and engage with the human educator throughout the virtual field trip.
    • Module 9.3 (NY ELA) Building and Communicating Knowledge through Research – Gain perspective into the lives of animals by meeting them virtually.
  • Eleventh + Twelfth Grade
    • 11-12SL1 (Common Core) Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on complex topics, texts, and issues; express ideas clearly and persuasively, and build on those of others, by by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections about animal agriculture and its impact on animals, humans, and the environment.
    • 11-12SL2 (Common Core) Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats (e.g., including visual, quantitative, and oral). Evaluate the credibility and accuracy of each source, and note any discrepancies among the data to make informed decisions and solve problems, by evaluating the importance of farmed animal sanctuaries through discussion about the lives of farmed on and off sanctuaries after a visual and oral presentation.
    • 11-12SL3 (Common Core) Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric; assess the premises and connections among ideas, diction, and tone, by interacting with the humane educator who is presenting a new viewpoint on the lives of farmed animals. Students are encouraged to ask questions and engage with the human educator throughout the virtual field trip.

Get an in-depth look at some of the types of animals who are rescued by Catskill Animal Sanctuary!

Your students will learn what it’s like to be one of the animals, and how we meet their needs for food, water, shelter, medical care, and, of course, love.

Choose from pigs, sheep, goats, chickens, turkeys, or cows. Or, if you can’t choose just one species, pick a few and we can do a series of programs to compare and contrast the animals.

  • All Grades
    • NYS Humane Education Law (NYS Only) Sanctuary programs provide education and instruction that cover a variety of topics pertaining to the humane treatment and protection of animals, the importance of the part they play in the economy of nature, and the necessity of controlling the proliferation of animals which are subsequently abandoned and caused to suffer extreme cruelty. These topics are presented in ways that are age and developmentally appropriate for the students.
  • Kindergarten
    • K-LS1-1 (NGSS) Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive, by learning about the needs of different types of farmed animals
    • KSL1 (Common Core) Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse peers and adults in small and large groups and during play, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections
    • KSL3 (Common Core) Develop and answer questions to clarify what the speaker says, by asking relevant questions to the material at hand.
    • Domain K-2 (NY ELA) The Five Senses – Explore the different ways that animals sense and experience the world. Which ones have the strongest sense of smell, or the best vision?
    • Domain K-5 (NY ELA) Farms – Introduce students to several farmed animals to learn how the sanctuary meets their needs for food, water, and space to live and grow. It will also provide a view on farmed animals in a non-farm context, where they are rescued and cared for as companions to live long, healthy lives.
  • First Grade
    • 1-LS1-2 (NGSS) Read texts and use media to determine patterns of behavior in parents and offspring that help offspring survive, by observing the behavior of animals who are related to each other.
    • 1-LS3-1 (NGSS) Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that young plants and animals are like, but not exactly like, their parents, by observing the appearance of animals who are related to each other
    • 1SL1 (Common Core) Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse peers and adults (e.g., in small and large groups and during play), by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections
    • 1SL3 (Common Core) Develop and answer questions to clarify what the speaker says and identify a speaker’s point of view, by asking relevant questions to the material at hand.
    • Domain 1-8 (NY ELA) Animals and Habitats – Students will learn about the different types of habitats that animals need, even when they live near each other, and learn about the adaptations that the animals have to survive and meet their needs.
  • Second Grade
    • 2-LS2-2 (NGSS) Develop a simple model that illustrates how plants and animals depend on each other for survival, by considering how the animals use plants as food and shelter, and how we help the animals by meeting their needs.
    • 2SL1 (Common Core) Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse peers and adults in small and large groups and during play, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections
    • 2SL3 (Common Core) Develop and answer questions about what a speaker says; agree or disagree with the speaker’s point of view, providing a reason(s), by asking relevant questions to the material at hand and expressing their opinions.
  • Third Grade
    • 3-LS2-1 (NGSS) Construct an argument that some animals form groups that help members survive, by examining the behavior of animals who live in groups.
    • 3-LS3-1 (NGSS) Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence that plants and animals have traits inherited from parents and that variation of these traits exists in a group of similar organisms, by observing members of the same species and/or breed who are and are not related to each other.
    • 3SL1 (Common Core) Participate and engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse peers and adults, expressing ideas clearly, and building on those of others, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections.
    • 3SL3 (Common Core) Ask and answer questions in order to evaluate a speaker’s point of view, offering appropriate elaboration and detail, by asking insightful questions to the material at hand and expanding upon other knowledge that they’ve gained.
  • Fourth Grade
    • 4-LS1-1 Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction, by examining and exploring the biological structures of farmed animals such as the horns of goats, nose of pigs, or stomach of cows.
    • 4-LS1-2 Use a model to describe that animals receive different types of information through their senses, process the information in their brain, and respond to the information in different ways, by comparing the use of senses across different types of animals, such as chickens (detailed eyesight), sheep (near-360 degree vision), or pigs (strong sense of smell).
    • 4LS1 (Common Core) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners, expressing ideas clearly, and building on those of others by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections.
    • 4SL3 (Common Core) Identify and evaluate the reasons and evidence a speaker provides to support particular points, by asking insightful questions to the material at hand and considering other learning and opinions.
    • Domain 2B (NY ELA) Animal Defense Mechanisms – Learn about some of the unique ways that animals keep themselves and other members of their group safe.
  • Fifth Grade
    • 5-ESS3-1 Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect Earth’s resources and environment, by considering different types of farming and their effects on the environment.
    • 5SL1 (Common Core) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners; express ideas clearly and persuasively, and build on those of others, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections
    • 5SL3 (Common Core) Identify and evaluate the reasons and evidence a speaker provides to support particular points, by asking insightful questions to the material at hand and formulating opinions based on this and other information.

Take a deep dive into learning about some of the species of animals who live at Catskill Animal Sanctuary.

Explore what’s involved in taking care of animals at sanctuary and how it’s different from the conditions from which they were rescued. We’ll also take a big-picture view and explore how humans have influenced the selection of traits of these animals, and how the farming of animals affects ecosystems and the atmosphere.

Available species include chickens, turkeys, pigs, goats, sheep, and cows—choose one species or several, and we can make a unique series of virtual tours for your students!

  • All Grades
    • MS-LS4-5 (NGSS) Gather and synthesize information about the technologies that have changed the way humans influence the inheritance of desired traits in organisms, by learning about how selective breeding of farmed animals has changed their appearance, size, rate of growth, and reproduction.
    • MS-LS2-5 (NGSS) Evaluate competing design solutions for maintaining biodiversity and protecting ecosystem stability, by exploring the environmental effects of types of farming.
    • MS-ESS3-5 (NGSS) Ask questions to clarify evidence of the factors that have caused the rise in global temperatures over the past century, by exploring how animal agriculture contributes to greenhouse gas emissions and how the scale of animal agriculture has grown in the last century.
    • MS-ESS3-4 (NGSS) Construct an argument supported by evidence for how increases in human population and per-capita consumption of natural resources impact Earth’s system, by exploring how the growth of animal agriculture has impacted resource consumption and contributes to greenhouse gas emissions and can contribute to water and air pollution.
    • MS-ESS3-3 (NGSS) Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment, by learning about the effects of different farming types on the environment and considering their costs and benefits.
    • SL1 (Common Core) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners; express ideas clearly and persuasively, and build on those of others, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections.
    • SL2 (Common Core) Interpret information presented in diverse formats (e.g., including visual, quantitative, and oral) and explain how it relates to a topic, text, or issue under study, by exploring why sanctuaries rescued farmed animals and engage in humane education to create a better world for humans and animals.
    • SL3 (Common Core) Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not, by exploring how sanctuaries interpret the individuality of farmed animals and what scientific evidence exists about farmed animal intelligence.
  • Seventh Grade
      • SL1 (Common Core) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners; express ideas clearly and persuasively, and build on those of others, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections.
      • SL2 (Common Core) Analyze the central ideas and supporting details presented in diverse formats (e.g., including visual, quantitative, and oral) and explain how the ideas clarify and/or contribute to a topic, text, or issue under study, by exploring why Sanctuaries rescued farmed animals and engage in humane education to create a better world for humans and animals.
      • SL3 (Common Core) Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating for sound reasoning, and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence, by exploring how sanctuaries interpret the individuality of farmed animals and what scientific evidence exists about farmed animal intelligence.
      • Module 4B (NY ELA) Water is Life – learn about the water pollution and water usage by different types of agriculture.
  • Eighth Grade
      • SL1 (Common Core) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners; express ideas clearly and persuasively, and build on those of others, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections.
      • SL2 (Common Core) Analyze the purpose of information presented in diverse formats (e.g., including visual, quantitative, and oral) and evaluate the motives (e.g., social, commercial, political) behind its presentation, by exploring why Sanctuaries rescued farmed animals and engage in humane education to create a better world for humans and animals.
      • SL3 (Common Core) Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating for sound reasoning, and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence; identify when irrelevant evidence is introduced, by exploring how sanctuaries interpret the individuality of farmed animals and what scientific evidence exists about farmed animal intelligence. Learning about farmed animals and agriculture through storytelling that combines anecdotes and scientific findings.
      • Module 4 (NY ELA) Sustainability of World’s Food Supply – Consider different perspectives of how to feed the United States.

Humans and farmed animals have a history going back thousands of years. Explore this relationship by focusing on an individual species.

Choose from chickens, turkeys, pigs, goats, sheep, or cows to see how humans have shaped the behaviors and traits of the animals, and how modern animal agriculture affects us, natural resources, and the environment as a whole.

You can also choose to do a multi-session program series to focus on the different relationships that we have had between the different species.

  • All Grades:
    • HS-LS2-7 Design, evaluate, and refine a solution for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity, by considering improvements that could be made to the agricultural industry.
    • HS-ESS3-2 (NGSS) Evaluate competing design solutions for developing, managing, and utilizing energy and mineral resources based on cost-benefit ratios, by exploring why farmers have moved towards industrial animal agriculture to improve resource efficiency and the impact of this revolution in farming on animals, humans, and the environment.
    • HS-ESS3-4 (NGSS) Evaluate or refine a technological solution that reduces impacts of human activities on natural systems, by learning about the impact of industrial animal agriculture on animals, humans, and the environment and exploring alternatives.
  • 9th -10th Grade
    • 9-10SL1 (Common Core) Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on complex topics, texts, and issues; express ideas clearly and persuasively, and build on those of others, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections about animal agriculture and its impact on animals, humans, and the environment.
    • 9-10SL2 (Common Core) Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats (e.g., including visual, quantitative, and oral), evaluating the credibility, accuracy, and relevance of each source, by evaluating the importance of farmed animal sanctuaries through discussion about the lives of farmed on and off sanctuaries after a visual and oral presentation.
    • 9-10SL3 (Common Core) Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric; identify any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence, by interacting with the humane educator who is presenting a new viewpoint on the lives of farmed animals. Students are encouraged to ask questions and engage with the human educator throughout the virtual field trip.
    • Module 9.3 (NY ELA) Building and Communicating Knowledge through Research – Gain perspective into the lives of animals by meeting them virtually.
  • 11th-12th Grade
    • 11-12SL1 (Common Core) Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on complex topics, texts, and issues; express ideas clearly and persuasively, and build on those of others, by by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections about animal agriculture and its impact on animals, humans, and the environment.
    • 11-12SL2 (Common Core) Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats (e.g., including visual, quantitative, and oral). Evaluate the credibility and accuracy of each source, and note any discrepancies among the data to make informed decisions and solve problems, by evaluating the importance of farmed animal sanctuaries through discussion about the lives of farmed on and off sanctuaries after a visual and oral presentation.
    • 11-12SL3 (Common Core) Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric; assess the premises and connections among ideas, diction, and tone, by interacting with the humane educator who is presenting a new viewpoint on the lives of farmed animals. Students are encouraged to ask questions and engage with the human educator throughout the virtual field trip.

Did you know that at any given moment, there are millions and millions of farmed animals in the United States? These animals tend to be hidden away on farms, but they have a big effect on the world around us.

By focusing on the effects of farming on water, air, or land, your students will explore the hidden costs of our everyday actions on the environment, and learn ways to help mitigate that impact.

And you’ll also get to virtually visit some of our rescued animals!

  • All Grades
    • NYS Humane Education Law (New York State Only) Sanctuary programs provide education and instruction that cover a variety of topics pertaining to the humane treatment and protection of animals, the importance of the part they play in the economy of nature, and the necessity of controlling the proliferation of animals which are subsequently abandoned and caused to suffer extreme cruelty. These topics are presented in ways that are age and developmentally appropriate for the students. 
  • 4th Grade
    • 4LS1 (Common Core) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners, expressing ideas clearly, and building on those of others by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections.
    • 4LS3 (Common Core) Identify and evaluate the reasons and evidence a speaker provides to support particular points, by asking insightful questions to the material at hand and considering other learning and opinions.
  • 5th Grade
    • 5-ESS3-1 Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect Earth’s resources and environment, by considering different types of farming and their effects on the environment.
    • 5SL1 (Common Core) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners; express ideas clearly and persuasively, and build on those of others, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections
    • 5SL3 (Common Core) Identify and evaluate the reasons and evidence a speaker provides to support particular points, by asking insightful questions to the material at hand and formulating opinions based on this and other information.

Sometimes, it can be hard to see or measure the impact of different actions on the environment. Raising animals for food has many hidden costs, including polluting the air and water, using up large tracts of land, and releasing greenhouse gasses into the atmosphere. Explore how these issues have shaped the current environment and how we can minimize these impacts to help protect the environment while visiting with some of the sanctuary’s residents, like pigs, chickens, goats, or cows.

  • All Grades
    • MS-LS2-5 Evaluate competing design solutions for maintaining biodiversity and protecting ecosystem stability, by exploring the environmental effects of types of farming such as land use, water use, and pollution.
    • MS-ESS3-5 (NGSS) Ask questions to clarify evidence of the factors that have caused the rise in global temperatures over the past century, by exploring how animal agriculture contributes to greenhouse gas emissions and how the scale of animal agriculture has grown in the last century.
    • MS-ESS3-4 (NGSS) Construct an argument supported by evidence for how increases in human population and per-capita consumption of natural resources impact Earth’s system, by exploring how the growth of animal agriculture has impacted resource consumption and contributes to greenhouse gas emissions and can contribute to water and air pollution.
    • MS-ESS3-3 Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment, by learning about the effects of different farming types of the environment and considering their costs and benefits in terms of water use, land use, and/or pollution.
  • 6th Grade
    • 6SL1 (Common Core) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners; express ideas clearly and persuasively, and build on those of others, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections.
    • 6SL2 (Common Core) Interpret information presented in diverse formats (e.g., including visual, quantitative, and oral) and explain how it relates to a topic, text, or issue under study, by exploring why sanctuaries rescued farmed animals and engage in humane education to create a better world for humans and animals.
    • 6SL3 (Common Core) Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not, by exploring how sanctuaries interpret the individuality of farmed animals and what scientific evidence exists about farmed animal intelligence.
  • 7th Grade
    • 7SL1 (Common Core) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners; express ideas clearly and persuasively, and build on those of others, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections.
    • 7SL2 (Common Core) Analyze the central ideas and supporting details presented in diverse formats (e.g., including visual, quantitative, and oral) and explain how the ideas clarify and/or contribute to a topic, text, or issue under study, by exploring why Sanctuaries rescued farmed animals and engage in humane education to create a better world for humans and animals.
    • 7SL3 (Common Core) Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating for sound reasoning, and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence, by exploring how sanctuaries interpret the individuality of farmed animals and what scientific evidence exists about farmed animal intelligence.
    • Module 4B (NY ELA) Water is Life – learn about the water pollution and water usage by different types of agriculture.
  • 8th Grade
    • 8SL1 (Common Core) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners; express ideas clearly and persuasively, and build on those of others, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections.
    • 8SL2 (Common Core) Analyze the purpose of information presented in diverse formats (e.g., including visual, quantitative, and oral) and evaluate the motives (e.g., social, commercial, political) behind its presentation, by exploring why Sanctuaries rescued farmed animals and engage in humane education to create a better world for humans and animals.
    • 8SL3 (Common Core) Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating for sound reasoning, and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence; identify when irrelevant evidence is introduced, by exploring how sanctuaries interpret the individuality of farmed animals and what scientific evidence exists about farmed animal intelligence. Learning about farmed animals and agriculture through storytelling that combines anecdotes and scientific findings.
    • Module 4 (NY ELA) Sustainability of World’s Food Supply – Consider different perspectives of how to feed the United States.

Raising animals for food has many hidden costs, including polluting the air and water, using up large tracts of land, and releasing greenhouse gasses into the atmosphere.

Students will consider these impacts in comparison to other major sources and explore ways that they can individually and collectively effect positive changes to the environment.

  • All Grades:
    • HS-LS2-7 Design, evaluate, and refine a solution for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity, by considering the effects of animal agriculture on the environment and steps that can be taken to mitigate those effects.
    • HS-ESS3-5 Analyze geoscience data and the results from global climate models to make an evidence-based forecast of the current rate of global or regional climate change and associated future impacts to Earth systems, by exploring the greenhouse gas emissions of the animal agriculture industry and the magnitude of its effects.
    • HS-ESS3-3 Create a computational simulation to illustrate the relationships among management of natural resources, the sustainability of human populations, and biodiversity, by considering animal agriculture as one component of natural resources management and per-capita consumption.
    • HS-ESS3-4 (NGSS) Evaluate or refine a technological solution that reduces impacts of human activities on natural systems, by learning about the impact of industrial animal agriculture on animals, humans, and the environment and exploring alternatives.
    • HS-ESS3-6 Use a computational representation to illustrate the relationships among Earth systems and how those relationships are being modified due to human activity, by exploring the effects of agriculture on waterways, oceanic “dead zones”, and other far-reaching impacts.
  • 9th-10th Grade
    • 9-10SL1 (Common Core) Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on complex topics, texts, and issues; express ideas clearly and persuasively, and build on those of others, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections about animal agriculture and its impact on animals, humans, and the environment.
    • 9-10SL2 (Common Core) Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats (e.g., including visual, quantitative, and oral), evaluating the credibility, accuracy, and relevance of each source, by evaluating the importance of farmed animal sanctuaries through discussion about the lives of farmed on and off sanctuaries after a visual and oral presentation.
    • 9-10SL3 (Common Core) Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric; identify any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence, by interacting with the humane educator who is presenting a new viewpoint on the lives of farmed animals. Students are encouraged to ask questions and engage with the human educator throughout the virtual field trip.
    • 11-12SL1 (Common Core) Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on complex topics, texts, and issues; express ideas clearly and persuasively, and build on those of others, by by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections about animal agriculture and its impact on animals, humans, and the environment.
    • 11-12SL2 (Common Core) Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats (e.g., including visual, quantitative, and oral). Evaluate the credibility and accuracy of each source, and note any discrepancies among the data to make informed decisions and solve problems, by evaluating the importance of farmed animal sanctuaries through discussion about the lives of farmed on and off sanctuaries after a visual and oral presentation.
    • 11-12SL3 (Common Core) Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric; assess the premises and connections among ideas, diction, and tone, by interacting with the humane educator who is presenting a new viewpoint on the lives of farmed animals. Students are encouraged to ask questions and engage with the human educator throughout the virtual field trip.

We often grow up with bucolic images of farms—wide open spaces with free-roaming, happy animals. Sadly, this picture is out of date, and modern animal agriculture is a very different industry today.

By meeting some of the rescued animals of the sanctuary and considering what their lives would be like if they had not been rescued, students will learn the truth about our food systems. Discussions will be held in an age-appropriate way and focus on the treatment of the animals and how the animals feel on a farm compared to an animal sanctuary.

  • All Grades:
    • NYS Humane Education Law (New York State Only) Sanctuary programs provide education and instruction that cover a variety of topics pertaining to the humane treatment and protection of animals, the importance of the part they play in the economy of nature, and the necessity of controlling the proliferation of animals which are subsequently abandoned and caused to suffer extreme cruelty. These topics are presented in ways that are age and developmentally appropriate for the students.
  • 4th Grade
    • 4-LS1-1 Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction, by examining and exploring the biological structures of farmed animals such as the horns of goats, nose of pigs, or stomach of cows.
    • 4-LS1-2 Use a model to describe that animals receive different types of information through their senses, process the information in their brain, and respond to the information in different ways, by comparing the use of senses across different types of animals, such as chickens (detailed eyesight), sheep (near-360 degree vision), or pigs (strong sense of smell).
    • 4LS1 (Common Core) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners, expressing ideas clearly, and building on those of others by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections.
    • 4SL3 (Common Core) Identify and evaluate the reasons and evidence a speaker provides to support particular points, by asking insightful questions to the material at hand and considering other learning and opinions.

5th Grade

    • 5SL1 (Common Core) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners; express ideas clearly and persuasively, and build on those of others, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections
    • 5SL3 (Common Core) Identify and evaluate the reasons and evidence a speaker provides to support particular points, by asking insightful questions to the material at hand and formulating opinions based on this and other information.

Many of us picture farms as places with a mixture of happy animals enjoying fresh air in a clean environment. Sadly, this image is out of line with the reality of thousands of animals confined for their entire lives, which has far-reaching consequences for public health and the environment.

In an age-appropriate manner, students will learn about the lives of animals at farms compared to those at sanctuaries and consider how positive changes can be made to help animals, humans, and the environment.

  • All Grades
    • MS-LS4-5 (NGSS) Gather and synthesize information about the technologies that have changed the way humans influence the inheritance of desired traits in organisms, by learning about how selective breeding of farmed animals has changed their appearance, size, rate of growth, and reproduction.
    • MS-ESS3-5 (NGSS)Ask questions to clarify evidence of the factors that have caused the rise in global temperatures over the past century, by exploring how animal agriculture contributes to greenhouse gas emissions and how the scale of animal agriculture has grown in the last century.
    • MS-ESS3-3 Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment, by learning about the effects of different farming types on the environment and considering their costs and benefits.
    • MS-ESS3-4 (NGSS) Construct an argument supported by evidence for how increases in human population and per-capita consumption of natural resources impact Earth’s system, by exploring how the growth of animal agriculture has impacted resource consumption and contributes to greenhouse gas emissions and can contribute to water and air pollution.
  • 6th Grade
    • 6SL1 (Common Core) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners; express ideas clearly and persuasively, and build on those of others, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections.
    • 6SL2 (Common Core) Interpret information presented in diverse formats (e.g., including visual, quantitative, and oral) and explain how it relates to a topic, text, or issue under study, by exploring why sanctuaries rescued farmed animals and engage in humane education to create a better world for humans and animals.
    • 6SL3 (Common Core) Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not, by exploring how sanctuaries interpret the individuality of farmed animals and what scientific evidence exists about farmed animal intelligence.
  • 7th Grade
    • 7SL1 (Common Core) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners; express ideas clearly and persuasively, and build on those of others, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections.
    • 7SL2 (Common Core) Analyze the central ideas and supporting details presented in diverse formats (e.g., including visual, quantitative, and oral) and explain how the ideas clarify and/or contribute to a topic, text, or issue under study, by exploring why Sanctuaries rescued farmed animals and engage in humane education to create a better world for humans and animals.
    • 7SL3 (Common Core) Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating for sound reasoning, and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence, by exploring how sanctuaries interpret the individuality of farmed animals and what scientific evidence exists about farmed animal intelligence.
    • Module 4B (NY ELA) Water is Life – learn about the water pollution and water usage by different types of agriculture.
  • 8th Grade
    • 8SL1 (Common Core) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners; express ideas clearly and persuasively, and build on those of others, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections.
    • 8SL2 (Common Core) Analyze the purpose of information presented in diverse formats (e.g., including visual, quantitative, and oral) and evaluate the motives (e.g., social, commercial, political) behind its presentation, by exploring why Sanctuaries rescued farmed animals and engage in humane education to create a better world for humans and animals.
    • 8SL3 (Common Core) Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating for sound reasoning, and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence; identify when irrelevant evidence is introduced, by exploring how sanctuaries interpret the individuality of farmed animals and what scientific evidence exists about farmed animal intelligence. Learning about farmed animals and agriculture through storytelling that combines anecdotes and scientific findings.
    • Module 4 (NY ELA) Sustainability of World’s Food Supply – Consider different perspectives of how to feed the United States.

The idyllic picture of farms with wide-open fields that many of us hold is not in line with the reality of modern agriculture. Unfortunately, today thousands of animals are confined in a single barn. This intensive concentration of animals negatively impacts their welfare, public health, and our environment.

In an age-appropriate way, students will learn about the truth behind animal agriculture, and about the work of farmed animal sanctuaries. Students will also consider how changes to these systems can help reduce the negative impacts to result in a better place to live for us all.

  • All Grades
    • HS-LS2-7 Design, evaluate, and refine a solution for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity, by considering improvements that could be made to the agricultural industry.
    • HS-ESS3-2 (NGSS) Evaluate competing design solutions for developing, managing, and utilizing energy and mineral resources based on cost-benefit ratios, by exploring why farmers have moved towards industrial animal agriculture to improve resource efficiency and the impact of this revolution in farming on animals, humans, and the environment.
    • HS-ESS3-5 (NGSS) Analyze geoscience data and the results from global climate models to make an evidence-based forecast of the current rate of global or regional climate change and associated future impacts to Earth systems, by exploring the greenhouse gas emissions of the animal agriculture industry and the magnitude of its effects.
    • HS-ESS3-1 (NGSS) Analyze geoscience data and the results from global climate models to make an evidence-based forecast of the current rate of global or regional climate change and associated future impacts to Earth systems, by exploring the greenhouse gas emissions of the animal agriculture industry and the magnitude of its effects.
    • HS-ESS3-6 (NGSS) Use a computational representation to illustrate the relationships among Earth systems and how those relationships are being modified due to human activity, by exploring the effects of agriculture on waterways, oceanic “dead zones”, and other far-reaching impacts.
    • HS-ESS3-4 (NGSS) Evaluate or refine a technological solution that reduces impacts of human activities on natural systems, by learning about the impact of industrial animal agriculture on animals, humans, and the environment and exploring alternatives
  • 9th-10th Grade
    • 9-10SL1 (Common Core) Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on complex topics, texts, and issues; express ideas clearly and persuasively, and build on those of others, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections about animal agriculture and its impact on animals, humans, and the environment.
    • 9-10SL2 (Common Core) Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats (e.g., including visual, quantitative, and oral), evaluating the credibility, accuracy, and relevance of each source, by evaluating the importance of farmed animal sanctuaries through discussion about the lives of farmed on and off sanctuaries after a visual and oral presentation.
    • 9-10SL3 (Common Core) Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric; identify any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence, by interacting with the humane educator who is presenting a new viewpoint on the lives of farmed animals. Students are encouraged to ask questions and engage with the human educator throughout the virtual field trip.
    • Module 9.3 (NY ELA) Building and Communicating Knowledge through Research – Gain perspective into the lives of animals by meeting them virtually.
  • 11th-12th Grade
    • 11-12SL1 (Common Core) Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on complex topics, texts, and issues; express ideas clearly and persuasively, and build on those of others, by interacting with classmates and the humane educator to ask questions, answer questions, and make connections about animal agriculture and its impact on animals, humans, and the environment.
    • 11-12SL2 (Common Core) Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats (e.g., including visual, quantitative, and oral). Evaluate the credibility and accuracy of each source, and note any discrepancies among the data to make informed decisions and solve problems, by evaluating the importance of farmed animal sanctuaries through discussion about the lives of farmed on and off sanctuaries after a visual and oral presentation.
    • 11-12SL3 (Common Core) Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric; assess the premises and connections among ideas, diction, and tone, by interacting with the humane educator who is presenting a new viewpoint on the lives of farmed animals. Students are encouraged to ask questions and engage with the human educator throughout the virtual field trip.